International and National Moot Court Competitions PDF Print E-mail

First International Children's Rights Moot 2014

The University of Leiden (Netherlands) and UNICEF hosted the first International Children's Rights Moot from 18 to 20 November 2014.  

2014-11-20 Leiden Moot

The moot was part of the Children's Rights week organised by the University of Leiden, UNICEF and the city of Leiden to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. 

The University of Pretoria's team mentored the Centre's attorneys, Karabo Ngidi and Carina du Toit, won the prize for Best Applicant. The team members were Stephen Buabeng Baiboo and Thandeka Khoza, both second year law students.

 

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Latest News

 6 September 2018

Press Release - Supreme Court of Appeal asked to protect the identities of child victims, witnesses and offenders

On Friday, 7 September 2018, the Supreme Court of Appeal will hear a case dealing with the protection of the identities of child victims, witnesses and offenders. The case, initiated by the Centre for Child Law, aims to ensure that child victims of crime, previously not protected by the law, should not have their personal details published in any form of media. Furthermore, that all children involved in criminal cases, whether as victims, witnesses or offenders, should have ongoing protection even after they turn 18. 

This case started when Zephany Nurse discovered, at the age of 17 years and 9 months old, that she had been kidnapped as a baby. She noticed that the media said they would reveal her 'true' identity when she turned 18 years. As she did not want to have her identity revealed, she turned to the Centre for assistance. An urgent High Court application resulted in an order, granted in April 2015, which protected her identity – which remains protected until all appeals in this case are exhausted.

The Centre will argue that the identification of children's identities, before and after they turn 18 years, can have a catastrophic impact on their lives. In order for identity protection for children to be meaningful, it cannot abruptly end when they turn 18.

For more please see the press release below:

Press Release

 

 

Centre for Child Law