International Child Law Instruments PDF Print E-mail
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International law and domestic human rights litigation in Africa - Magnus Killander (editor)


The role of international law in the development of children’s rights in South Africa: A children’s rights litigator’s perspective (Chapter 10). Karabo Ngidi


United Nations

United Nations Convention On The Rights Of The Child
An international convention that has been ratified by almost all of the nations of the world, including South Africa
Committee on the Rights of the Child (United Nations website)
This Committee develops various General Comments relating to the rights of children
United Nations Guidelines For The Prevention Of Juvenile Delinquency
A set of international guidelines for nations to guide the prevention of children becoming involved in crime. Also known as the "Riyadh Guidelines"

United Nations Rules For The Protection Of Juveniles Deprived Of Their Liberty
A set of international rules relating to the care and treatment of all children who have been placed in facilities from which they cannot leave at will. Also known as the "JDLs"

United Nations Minimum Rules For The Administration Of Juvenile Justice
A set of international minimum rules for the administration of juvenile justice. Also known as the "Beijing Rules"

African Charter

African Charter On The Rights And Welfare Of Children
A regional charter ratified by numerous African nations, including South Africa

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Latest News

13 March 2018

Centre for Child Law & Children's Institute make joint oral submissions on the Traditional Courts Bill

On 14 March 2018 The Centre for Child Law and the Children's Institute will make joint oral submissions to the 
Portfolio Committee on Justice and Constitutional Development on the Traditional Courts Bill.

The CCL and CI welcmoe numerous changes that have been made to the latest draft of the Bill. We note with
appreciation that the latest version of the Bill underlines that participation in traditional court proceedings is
voluntary; and creates mechanims for 'opting out' of the traditional court system.

The CCL and CI also welcome the express commitment of the Bill to the constitutional rights enshrined in chapter 2
of the South African Constitution.

The CCL and CI submit that the Bill needs to be further strengthened to ensure that children's rights are adequately
protected in proceedings of Traditional Courts. In light of existing social norms and the profound violation of children's rights
across the country, there is a need for vigilance and strong accountability systems to ensure that people tasked with protecting
children do not abuse their power.

Read the submissions here.



Centre for Child Law