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International law and domestic human rights litigation in Africa - Magnus Killander (editor)

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The role of international law in the development of children’s rights in South Africa: A children’s rights litigator’s perspective (Chapter 10). Karabo Ngidi

 

United Nations

United Nations Convention On The Rights Of The Child
An international convention that has been ratified by almost all of the nations of the world, including South Africa
 
Committee on the Rights of the Child (United Nations website)
This Committee develops various General Comments relating to the rights of children
 
United Nations Guidelines For The Prevention Of Juvenile Delinquency
A set of international guidelines for nations to guide the prevention of children becoming involved in crime. Also known as the "Riyadh Guidelines"

United Nations Rules For The Protection Of Juveniles Deprived Of Their Liberty
A set of international rules relating to the care and treatment of all children who have been placed in facilities from which they cannot leave at will. Also known as the "JDLs"

United Nations Minimum Rules For The Administration Of Juvenile Justice
A set of international minimum rules for the administration of juvenile justice. Also known as the "Beijing Rules"
 
 

African Charter

African Charter On The Rights And Welfare Of Children
A regional charter ratified by numerous African nations, including South Africa
 
 

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Latest News

16 October 2017

Winners of 2017 Child Law Moot Court Competition

Winner of Best Team 2017

University of Pretoria represented by Nicholas Herd and Motlotleng Sebola

 Best team 2017

 

Winner of Best Heads of Argument 2017

 University of Johannesburg represented by Ntokozo Sobikwa and Takudzwa Dente

 Best heads 2017

 

Winner of Best Oralist 2017

 Takudzwa Dente, University of Johannesburg

 Best oralist 2017

The Centre for Child Law hosted its 8th Annual Child Law Moot Court Competition on 13 and 14 October 2017. 8 Universities participated in the competition: University of the Witwatersrand; University of the Free State; University of Cape Town; University of South Africa; University of Pretoria; North West University; Rhodes University and University of Johannesburg. We had the assistance of academics, attorneys and advocates who were judges in the preliminary and semi-final rounds of the competition.

The teams were impressive and set a very high standard.

The final round of the competition was held at the High Court of South Africa, Pretoria in Court Room C of the Palace of Justice. Court Room C was used because of its historical significance. This was the Court Room in which the Rivonia trial was held.

The University of Cape Town and University of Pretoria made it to the final round as the two finalists. The two teams argued in front of Judge Tolmay of the High Court, Pretoria; Judge Kollapen of the High Court, Pretoria (currently acting at the Constitutional Court); and Ms Corlett Letlojane the Executive Director of the Human Rights Institute of South Africa. University of Pretoria emerged as the Best Team of 2017. The runners up were University of Cape Town, represented by Nigel Patel and Andrew Attieh.

 

Centre for Child Law