Academic Programmes: LLB Elective PDF Print E-mail

(KID 410) CHILD LAW 410

KID 410 is presented by the Faculty of Law, University of Pretoria

In 2009 a final year elective in Child Law was introduced. The Centre co-ordinates this course which falls under Private Law, although it includes lectures on a wide range of topics and – as is always the case with child law – it does not fit neatly into any of the divisions of law. The course attracted about 40 students in its first year. In 2009 the Centre, partnered by CE@UP, offered several certificate courses in Child Law.

Amount of lectures per week: 2 (10 credits)
Course: LLB

Topics covered:

  1. The status of children in South African law
  2. The constitutional protection of children
  3. General principles of the Children’s Act 38 of 2005
  4. Parental responsibilities and rights
  5. Children courts
  6. Adoption and alternative care
  7. International instruments pertaining to children’s rights
  8. Inter-country adoption and international abduction
  9. Children and the criminal justice system


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Latest News

13 March 2018

Centre for Child Law & Children's Institute make joint oral submissions on the Traditional Courts Bill

On 14 March 2018 The Centre for Child Law and the Children's Institute will make joint oral submissions to the 
Portfolio Committee on Justice and Constitutional Development on the Traditional Courts Bill.

The CCL and CI welcmoe numerous changes that have been made to the latest draft of the Bill. We note with
appreciation that the latest version of the Bill underlines that participation in traditional court proceedings is
voluntary; and creates mechanims for 'opting out' of the traditional court system.

The CCL and CI also welcome the express commitment of the Bill to the constitutional rights enshrined in chapter 2
of the South African Constitution.

The CCL and CI submit that the Bill needs to be further strengthened to ensure that children's rights are adequately
protected in proceedings of Traditional Courts. In light of existing social norms and the profound violation of children's rights
across the country, there is a need for vigilance and strong accountability systems to ensure that people tasked with protecting
children do not abuse their power.

Read the submissions here.



Centre for Child Law