Academic Programmes: LLB Elective PDF Print E-mail

(KID 410) CHILD LAW 410

KID 410 is presented by the Faculty of Law, University of Pretoria

In 2009 a final year elective in Child Law was introduced. The Centre co-ordinates this course which falls under Private Law, although it includes lectures on a wide range of topics and – as is always the case with child law – it does not fit neatly into any of the divisions of law. The course attracted about 40 students in its first year. In 2009 the Centre, partnered by CE@UP, offered several certificate courses in Child Law.

Amount of lectures per week: 2 (10 credits)
Course: LLB

Topics covered:

  1. The status of children in South African law
  2. The constitutional protection of children
  3. General principles of the Children’s Act 38 of 2005
  4. Parental responsibilities and rights
  5. Children courts
  6. Adoption and alternative care
  7. International instruments pertaining to children’s rights
  8. Inter-country adoption and international abduction
  9. Children and the criminal justice system

 

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Latest News

 6 September 2018

Press Release - Supreme Court of Appeal asked to protect the identities of child victims, witnesses and offenders

On Friday, 7 September 2018, the Supreme Court of Appeal will hear a case dealing with the protection of the identities of child victims, witnesses and offenders. The case, initiated by the Centre for Child Law, aims to ensure that child victims of crime, previously not protected by the law, should not have their personal details published in any form of media. Furthermore, that all children involved in criminal cases, whether as victims, witnesses or offenders, should have ongoing protection even after they turn 18. 

This case started when Zephany Nurse discovered, at the age of 17 years and 9 months old, that she had been kidnapped as a baby. She noticed that the media said they would reveal her 'true' identity when she turned 18 years. As she did not want to have her identity revealed, she turned to the Centre for assistance. An urgent High Court application resulted in an order, granted in April 2015, which protected her identity – which remains protected until all appeals in this case are exhausted.

The Centre will argue that the identification of children's identities, before and after they turn 18 years, can have a catastrophic impact on their lives. In order for identity protection for children to be meaningful, it cannot abruptly end when they turn 18.

For more please see the press release below:

Press Release

 

 

Centre for Child Law