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The Centre for Child Law is based in the Law Faculty at the University of Pretoria. The official launch of the Centre was held in October 1998. The Director of the Centre for Child Law at the University of Pretoria is Prof Ann Skelton.

The Centre contributes towards establishing and promoting the best interests of children in our community through education, research, advocacy and litigation.

 The Centre benefits from the funding and support of the following donors in 2018:

  • University of Pretoria
  • Claude Leon Foundation
  • Constitutionalism Fund
  • Elma Foundation        
  • Open Society Foundation South Africa
  • Sigrid Rausing Trust
  • RAITH Foundation

 

 

Director

Ann CRC brochure lowres

Prof Ann Skelton

 
 

Deputy Director

Karabo 2018 Karabo Ozah

 
 

Senior Attorney

Anjuli 2 cropped

Anjuli Maistry

Junior Attorney

 

Litha Stwayi

Administrator

 
 Pontso
Pontso Phahlane


Research, Monitoring and Evaluation

 

 

Zita Hansungule

 

 Isabel 2

Isabel Magaya

 
Candidate Attorneys

 Stanley2016

Stanley Malematja

 

David2016

David Mtshali

Alexandra 2

Alexandra Klonarides 

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Latest News

 6 September 2018

Press Release - Supreme Court of Appeal asked to protect the identities of child victims, witnesses and offenders

On Friday, 7 September 2018, the Supreme Court of Appeal will hear a case dealing with the protection of the identities of child victims, witnesses and offenders. The case, initiated by the Centre for Child Law, aims to ensure that child victims of crime, previously not protected by the law, should not have their personal details published in any form of media. Furthermore, that all children involved in criminal cases, whether as victims, witnesses or offenders, should have ongoing protection even after they turn 18. 

This case started when Zephany Nurse discovered, at the age of 17 years and 9 months old, that she had been kidnapped as a baby. She noticed that the media said they would reveal her 'true' identity when she turned 18 years. As she did not want to have her identity revealed, she turned to the Centre for assistance. An urgent High Court application resulted in an order, granted in April 2015, which protected her identity – which remains protected until all appeals in this case are exhausted.

The Centre will argue that the identification of children's identities, before and after they turn 18 years, can have a catastrophic impact on their lives. In order for identity protection for children to be meaningful, it cannot abruptly end when they turn 18.

For more please see the press release below:

Press Release

 

 

Centre for Child Law