Centre for Child Law PDF Print E-mail

The Centre for Child Law  was established in 1998 and is based in the Faculty of Law at the University of Pretoria. The Director of the Centre is Prof Ann Skelton.

The Centre contributes towards the establishment and promotion of the best interests of children in South Africa through litigation, advocacy, research and education.

The Centre is registered as a Law Clinic and through strategic impact litigation aims to set legal precedent to improve and strengthen laws pertaining to children.

University of Pretoria Faculty of Law

 

Latest Judgments & Reports

6 February 2018

 NS & Others v Presiding Officer of the Children's Court. Children's Court jurisdiction to heard adoption matters.  
Read the judgment here 

 

 

1 December 2017 

Dladla & Another v The City of Johannesburg. Temporary housing accommodation.
Read the judgment here

 

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Latest News

18 May 2018

Centre for Child Law represented at Continental Conference on Access to Justice for Children in Africa

On 8 to 10 May 2018, the Centre's Karabo Ozah and Zita Hansungule attended the Continental Conference on
Access to Justice for Children in Africa held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The Conference was hosted by the African
Child Policy Forum (ACPF) and Defence for Children International (DCI).

The discussions and deliberations dealt with a number of issues related to access to justice for children including:
legal pluralism in Africa and its impact on access to justice for children; access to justice for children in the context
of armed conflict; vulnerability and access to justice for children; access to justice for children with disabilities in Africa;
and technology and children's access to justice.

A new report from ACPF was launched at the conference: "Spotlighting the invisible – Justice for Children in Africa".
The Centre's Ms Karabo Ozah reflected on the report as a child right's expert. Ms Ozah reflections on the findings of the
report; highlighted practical realities dealt with in the report; and gave recommendations on the way forward. Ms 
Hansungule reflected on the litigation and advocacy work that the Centre has engaged in to ensure access for children
with psychosocial disabilities, in particular children with behavioural difficulties. 

At the conclusion of the Conference a call to action was adopted by participants. The call to action urged various duty
bearers to make access to justice a reality for all children on the African continent. The duty bearers include: African
Governments; AU Organs and Treaty Bodies; The UN Committee on the Rights of the Child; Civil Society Organisations;
International Non-Governmental Organisations; UN Agencies; Academic Institutions; and Development and Multilateral
partners.

The Centre for Child Law aims to use the report and call for action to enhance their work in protecting and promoting
the rights of children, in particular access to justice for children, in South Africa and work towards a child-friendly justice
system.

For more read an article on the University of Pretoria, Faculty of Law website here.

 

 

 

 

Centre for Child Law