Centre for Child Law PDF Print E-mail

The Centre for Child Law  was established in 1998 and is based in the Faculty of Law at the University of Pretoria. The Director of the Centre is Prof Ann Skelton.

The Centre contributes towards the establishment and promotion of the best interests of children in South Africa through litigation, advocacy, research and education.

The Centre is registered as a Law Clinic and through strategic impact litigation aims to set legal precedent to improve and strengthen laws pertaining to children.

University of Pretoria Faculty of Law

 

Latest Judgments & Reports

2 August 2018

 Centre for Child Law v MEC for Social Development, Gauteng. Provision of appropriate services to children with severe or profound disruptive behaviour disorder  
Read the court order here 

 

 

27 June 2018

 Naki & Others v Director-General: Department of Home Affairs. Ensuring access to birth registration for all children  
Read the judgment here

 

Upcoming Cases and Events

          

7 September 2018

 Centre for Child Law & Others v Media 24 Limited and Others - Protecting the identities of child victims, witnesses and offenders  

Supreme Court of Appeal - Bloemfontein

 

 

 
 


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Latest News

 6 September 2018

Press Release - Supreme Court of Appeal asked to protect the identities of child victims, witnesses and offenders

On Friday, 7 September 2018, the Supreme Court of Appeal will hear a case dealing with the protection of the identities of child victims, witnesses and offenders. The case, initiated by the Centre for Child Law, aims to ensure that child victims of crime, previously not protected by the law, should not have their personal details published in any form of media. Furthermore, that all children involved in criminal cases, whether as victims, witnesses or offenders, should have ongoing protection even after they turn 18. 

This case started when Zephany Nurse discovered, at the age of 17 years and 9 months old, that she had been kidnapped as a baby. She noticed that the media said they would reveal her 'true' identity when she turned 18 years. As she did not want to have her identity revealed, she turned to the Centre for assistance. An urgent High Court application resulted in an order, granted in April 2015, which protected her identity – which remains protected until all appeals in this case are exhausted.

The Centre will argue that the identification of children's identities, before and after they turn 18 years, can have a catastrophic impact on their lives. In order for identity protection for children to be meaningful, it cannot abruptly end when they turn 18.

For more please see the press release below:

Press Release

 

 

Centre for Child Law